C-SPAN Classroom

C-SPAN Classroom. Posted by Cynthia Terrell on October 24, 2016

http://www.c-spanclassroom.org/Campaign-2016.aspx

This section of the website, developed by our 2015 Summer Teacher Fellows, provides explanations of the various aspects of the election process for candidates vying to become the next President of the United States. Separated into 10 main areas, each topic is supplemented with related video clips, discussion questions, handouts, and culminating activities to reinforce students' learning.

Gender & Presidential Campaigns

  • Video Clip: Millennial Women and the Election (07/26/16 – 3:30)
    A panel discussed the demographic of millennial women, the issues important to them, and their impact in electoral politics.
     
  • Video Clip: The Number of Women in Elected Office (10/17/2015 – 5:36)
    Cynthia Terrell talked about Representation 2020's report, The State of Women's Representation 2015-2016: A Blueprint for Reaching Gender Parity, which shows women are underrepresented in national, state, and local-level elected offices. She also examined possible solutions to achieve parity.
     
  • Video Clip: Impact of Women in Politics (01/03/2014 – 3:41)
    American University Women and Politics Institute Director Jennifer Lawless talked about the number of women in political office as of 2014.
     
  • Video Clip: Statistics of Women in Politics (6/9/2008 – 1:57)
    Fred Hochberg, Dean of the Milano New School for Management & Urban Policy gave the introductory speech, which included statistics about the number of women in politics in the U.S.
     
  • Video Clip: Media Coverage of Sen. Hillary Clinton’s 2008 Campaign (7/9/2008 – 6:32)
    A discussion titled, "Women in Charge: The Evolving Role of Women in Politics" was held in the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium of the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center. Panelists Andrea Bernstein, Dee Dee Myers, & Ellen Malcolm discuss the media's coverage of Hillary Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign. *Some language may be offensive to younger viewers.*
     
  • Video Clip: Benefits of Gender in Sen. Hillary Clinton's 2008 Campaign (7/9/2008 – 6:09)
    A discussion titled, "Women in Charge: The Evolving Role of Women in Politics" was held in the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Auditorium of the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center. Panelists Andrea Bernstein, Dee Dee Myers, & Ellen Malcolm discuss the ways that gender benefitted Clinton's 2008 campaign.
     
  • Video Clip: Sen. Hillary Clinton's Concession Speech 2008 (6/7/2008 – 7:51)
    Senator Hillary Clinton spoke to her supporters during a final campaign rally at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. She spoke about the race and gender barriers her and Sen. Obama broke during their campaigns.
     
  • Video Clip: Women as Voters (3/25/2008 – 7:28)
    Panelist Susan Carroll talked about women as voters and activists. She focused on the suffrage movement and emerging trends among women voters in the 2008 election and beyond. This event was held at the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum.
     
  • Video Clip: 2008 Gov. Sarah Palin Vice Presidential Acceptance Speech (9/3/2008 – 3:09)
    Governor Sarah Palin (R-AK) said she would accept the Republican Party’s nomination as vice president at the 2008 Republican National Convention.
     
  • Video Clip: 1984 Rep. Geraldine Ferraro Vice Presidential Campaign Nomination Announcement (07/19/1984 – 2:12)
    Footage from the 1984 Democratic National Convention at which Rep. Geraldine Ferraro (D-NY) accepted the Democratic party's nomination for Vice President.
     
  • Video Clip: 1972 Rep. Shirley Chisholm Presidential Campaign Announcement (01/25/1972 – 4:54)
    Representative Shirley Chisholm (D-NY) announced her bid to run for the Democratic nomination for the 1972 presidential campaign against presumed Republican nominee President Nixon.



Culminating Assessment:

  1. Have students create a timeline of historical events in the race and gender equality movements. Then discuss progress and areas where we still need to improve.
  2. Research other minorities and women who have run for office. How was their path similar or dissimilar to the examples provided above?


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