Representation20/20's Vision:

A thriving democracy is within our reach but we must level the playing field for women candidates across the racial, political, and geographic spectrum so that our nation's rich diversity is reflected in our elected bodies.

Electing more women to every level of government will strengthen our democracy by making it more representative, reviving bi-partisanship & collaboration, improving policy outcomes, encouraging a new style of leadership, and building greater trust in our elected bodies.

Join us in turning public passion for gender parity into action and results

The Path to Gender Parity

The percentage of women serving in elected office has increased very little since the "year of the woman" and the United States now ranks behind 99 nations in the representation of women. With the momentum of the 2016 elections at our backs we can win gender parity for women in elected office in our lifetimes but only if we embrace new strategies that tackle the root causes of the problem and fundamentally level the playing field for all women candidates.

Women Running

Women Running

Recruitment

Women Winning

Women Winning

Electoral Reform

Women Serving & Leading

Women Serving & Leading

Fairer Practices

Where Does Your State Rank?

Find out where your state ranks in the Gender Parity Index – the baseline to show progress toward parity in the states.

Representation20/20 in the News

Weekend Reading on Women's Representation May 5, 2017

Posted on May 05, 2017

The Ms Foundation, EMILY's List, VoteRunLead, Running Start, Right Women Right Now, She Should Run, IGNITE, Emerge, Higher Heights, VIEW PAC, Empowered Women, Latinas Represent, Rachel's Network, Sally's List, Close the Gap CA, What Will it Take, and Project Mine the Gap represent just a sliver of the many organizations celebrating women's leadership and pushing for parity for women in government in the United States. We are energized and we are mobilized - we just need a new, more strategic mix of tactics to ensure that in our lifetime government (and legislation) is of the people, by the people, and for the people. It's incumbent on us to pool our many talents and pursue data-driven strategies! During a news segment an Australian MP argued that gender quotas may be necessary to increase the number of women in parliament - especially conservatives: Sarah Henderson says gender quotas may be needed to boost the number of conservative women in parliament. At present there are 13 female MPs out of 76 Coalition members of the House of Representatives, with four of the six most marginal seats also held by women. Ms Henderson who holds the Victorian seat of Corangamite has told Sky News the Liberal party needs to take gender representation 'more seriously.''We absolutely have a problem, we have thirteen women in the House of Reps and that's not good enough.'

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation April 28, 2017

Posted on April 28, 2017

Every week brings reminders of the pressing need to elect more women from across the racial, political, and geographic spectrum along with indications that our work is gaining traction. I am heartened by the many opportunities for collaboration and interaction with each of you! Lee Drutman wrote an excellent piece for Vox that describes why polarization and re-election of incumbents is at an all-time high - this translates into very, very few opportunities for women to enter state and federal politics. Lee goes on to endorse the Fair Representation Act, which will be introduced in Congress in June (!), that will dramatically increase the opportunities for women to run and win by establishing multi-winner districts with ranked choice voting for U.S. House elections. This same model can also be implemented at the state level and will have a similar impact on increasing the opportunities for new voices in government. Reihan Salam, editor of the National Review, wrote a similar critique of our current system a couple years ago - stay tuned for much more on this! Pippa Norris, one of the leading experts on the relationship between electoral systems and women's representation, was interviewed just this week by World Policy Journal about her work on election integrity. During the interview she was asked: How does election reform affect the representation of women in government?

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Weekend Reading on Women's Representation April 21, 2017

Posted on April 21, 2017

The Federalist ran a fascinating blog by Patrick Fletchall titled "When Pushing Women's Advancement, Big Businesses Are Hypocrites" - the entire piece is very worth reading but here is a teaser: "To be clear, the issue isn’t that companies don’t make a priority of hiring women. Many companies like Bank of America, Target, and Moss Adams have initiatives specifically to hire and support women. Instead, the challenge is the trickle of women who have been able to break the ceiling into executive-level management. Why is this important? As I’ve mentioned, I think these ad campaigns are great. They hit me right in the feels. But we shouldn’t kid ourselves that executive leadership in corporate business have all of a sudden decided to started seeing women’s intrinsic rather than profitable value. These ad campaigns represent consumer-product companies telling women what they think they want to hear, without changing their executive structure to practice what they preach. The message is further complicated by the fact that it affirms certain life choices for women while ignoring the millions of women who choose to be the chief operating officer of their homes. Commercials are fine and awareness is nice, but until women have a seat at the table, these campaigns are a case of “Do as I say, not as I do.” By all means, dream big, princess—as long as you don’t dream of being an executive at Disney. If you do, you’re buying exactly what they’re selling."

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